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-wage china when he was on the board of gateway computer. he wants to turn michigan into the same low wage environment we see in china. >> reporter: looking around here live at the scene at the capitol, you have teachers who took the day off from school to demonstrate. you have united auto workers. we saw several big trucks from the teamsters. a lot of people sympathetic to efforts of these workers out here making their voices heard, expressing their discontent with what has happened. governor snyder told me a short time ago this is in response to a ballot initiative you remember failed in november. that was proposition 2. it would have put collective bargaining in the michigan constitution. it would have made it untouchable by any kind of new legislation. that is part of the complaint from the democrats. they say it is politics and retribution. also the complaint you hear from democrats it happened so fast. it happened without the public having time for input. what you see on the lawn is something governor snyder referenced f there wasn't enough time for public input you wouldn't have all
, as of right now china owns $1.15 trillion of our debt. then, number two on the list, is japan with $1.13 trillion of our debt. now, this is interesting. out of this debt number three on the list is opec. opec is an entity. that's the countries of ecuador and venezuela and india and bahrain and iran and iraq and kuwait and amman and qatar and saudi arabia and the u.a.e., algeria, ga been a, -- gabon, nigeria. they're now number three on the list and they own $267 billion of our debt. brazil comes in at number four, $250.5 billion. and then number five on the list, new to the list, the top five list, the caribbean banking centers. now own $240.4 billion of u.s. debt. by the way, caribbean banking centers are the bahamas, bermuda, cayman islands, netherlands and panama. this is who owns us. this is who owns our debt. and this is why on this side of the aisle, what we continue to say is the spending has to be dealt with. we have seen -- we've heard from everybody. we are hearing from economists all around the globe. and they repeatedly say what we are saying, what we've been saying for ye
a satellite into orbit. its neighbors are unnerved. even china expressed regret at the move. the obama administration condemned it as a provocative act and will likely ask the u.n. security council to impose crippling sanctions. the pentagon following developments this morning. chris lawrence there. what do you know, chris? >> right now, officials say that object that north korea put into orbit, monitoring it, analyzing it, but they confirm it is in orbit. why is that important? the same technology you would use to put into orbit is the same technology you use to develop long-range ballistic missiles, the u.s. condemned this act. they are worried about the marriage of north korea's nuclear weapons with this long-range missile technology. this is the type of missile that if it was successful, as it appears to be, could reach parts of the united states, alaska, u.s. military bases in hawaii. but a u.s. efficiently i spoke with who used to work on north north korea for the defense department told me, there are still areas in which north korea has not made it as far as they would need to i
is unacceptable. the people's republic of china, which is not exactly a beacon of hope for those looking for religious liberty. we all know the situation in tibet which is not just a religious issue, it's an ethnic issue, a cultural issue. we see the self-emolation of folks willing to burn alive because it's so intolerable what they're going through and the effort of that government to wipe out their identity. but it goes much deeper than that. proselytizing governments, nonpatriotic catholics. understand that the chinese government authorizes the catholic church, who the leadership of that church can be. truly unique in all the world you have a government that tells you who your bishops are, who tells you who gets to run your church. if you worship outside of that setting, you're persecuted. there are others, the tibetan beautists i mentioned before but -- buddhists that i talked before. but it's not just religious believers who are facing persecution in china. this is from the report, the chinese government continues to harass, detain, intimidate, disbar and forcibly disappear, forcibl
deficit to china being $29.8 billion per month. that is just one country. you start to add up all the trade deficit that we have with all of these different trading partners over the years, i am sure that it is close to about $1 trillion per year. >> thank you for the comments. let's go to sarasota next. caller: good afternoon. the way that i look at it, as a 74-year-old professional pharmacist with a minor in economics, the reason i am independent is because republicans and democrats cannot seem to get it together. the biggest problem that we have now is the reason why we cannot do what we are supposed to do for the entire country. one middleman adnan grover norquist. someone who was never even elected. here is a man that has caused all the problems. all of the republicans have signed this pledge, which to me is unconstitutional. without him, we would not be talking today. >> salem, oregon, republican line. you are on the air. caller: good morning. as a college student, and i have listened to every single caller, this is an embarrassing day for our country. i am a first-time job
it anymore. he wasn't satisfied with outsourcing thousands of jobs to low wage china when he was on the board of gateway computer. he wants to turn michigan into the same low-wage environment we see in china. >> reporter: as you look at state troopers out here right now, some are equipped with batons. look at their hips. what they have on their hips there are gas masks. you can see some weapons they're carrying. nonlethal weapons that would be used to dispurse the tear gas if it was needed to. as we bring up we heard someone shouting in the background it has been a peaceful demonstration. it has. there was trouble on the first day. eight people were arrested. a little bit of tear gas went out. here in this demonstration, things have been peaceful. nothing more than a lot of people showing up in numbers expressing discontent with the legislature and the speed with this legislation and speed which it moved through the legislature, jenna, mike, we saw a sign behind you. it said there is war on workers in the state of michigan. what is the primary gripe of unions and their members? >> reporter: w
deal, it will be one of the largest ever by chinese investors. china's state owned oil giant c-nook swooped in to acquire nexen for a cool $15 billion. note to the obama administration, it is not happening in a bubble. last year you'll recall the obama administration put off a decision on the excel pipeline, an extension of a pipeline that would connect the oil in alberta to the gulf of mexico and international markets. the democrats killed it because of concerns from environmentalists. the proposed route crossed the aquifer in nebraska and white house and state department officials could have just insisted on rerouting the pipe, but they didn't. a bad move, one that was highly thought to play to the president's base. now that the elections are over, a review of a new route will begin sometime next year. the leakages of that pipe were a minor concern, though it got all the headlines. a more legitimate environmental concern is carbon emissions. processing crude that is mined from the oil sands emits double the emissions of regular drilled oil. but oil sands still -- that still s
to america at 14, 15, $16 an hour. we don't celebrate that. i'm glad they're here instead of china, but heck. if we had an economy that would support $30-an-hour jobs, i'd be for that. better than a ceo. you know, destroying a company and then getting a $200 million payout. but that said, what is wrong with a state allowing an american to work where he or she wants to work without having to be compelled to pay union dues? >> well, this state, michigan, was such a part of the core of unionism in this country, the foundation of the united automobile workers which at one point had over 1 million workers in its enrollment is now down to roughly maybe 350,000 workers. the united automobile workers, everybody can own a car in america. the history of unionism has been inextricably linked to the growth of the middle class, as you know, over the last 60 years of american history. the right-to-work legislation that has passed now in 24 states, i don't think you can dem demonstrably prove that it leads to higher wages, that it leads to marginally -- >> but what's wrong with giving people the freedom to
is long but it starts in asia with the rise of china and india as economic, political and military powers. the obama administration has conspicuously announced a pivot to asia. at the center of this pivot is china, which exists as both an adversary to certain u.s. interests and a fellow traveler sharing mutual goals and vulnerabilities on others. the ongoing challenge will be for the united states to disce discern, sometimes issue by issue, whether china is an adversary or a partner. and this calibration will impact america's relations with the rest of asia and may ultimately determine prospects for war or peace in this world. while visiting indonesia, thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage to the circumstances with china. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursuit prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen
standard of living. a list of such changes is long, but its start in asia with the rise of china and india -- but it starts in asia with the rise of china and india. at the center of this pivot is china, which exits as an adversary and a fellow traveler, ensuring mutual goals -- in sharing mutual goals -- as a fellow traveler, sharing mutual goals. this will impact american relations with the rest of asia and may even help determine prospects for peace or war. in visiting thailand and the philippines in october, i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that that tend countries comprise an asean represent now the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage. we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursue prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen american economic growth. more broadly, we face the specter of global resource constraints, especially efficiencies of energy and food that could stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. we have made startling gains i
of lives, syria's only friends in the world have been naturally iran and china but also their best friends, russia. russia. and that was true until today. russia today did not formally declare that they're no longer going to support the syrian government against the rebels, but for the first time a high-ranking russian official said publicly that yeah, it looks like assad is going to lose this war. i mean, the united states has been saying that forever. nato has been saying that forever. everybody who wants assad to go has been saying that forever. you try to create an air of inevitability about the thing you want to happen. right? that makes sense. but now for the other side to be saying it, for syria's best friend to be saying yeah, syria, you're going to lose this, it's going to happen, that is a huge, huge deal. it is sometimes hard to follow the day-to-day news out of this war, to know what is an important day and what is just another awful day. but this is a really important moment. because syria was sort of down to their last friend in the world. and if they are now down to not even
was union and we were making $16 an hour. it went overseas. the company would prefer to go to china and a somebody $2 a day or whatever. these right-to-work states are full of temporary jobs agencies with contracts. the stamp services -- these temporary services are making money and paying people a fraction. we need to let politicians go to a temporary service and give them half of what they are making and make them see how we feel. people working for small amounts of money at temp services. ynette.ow to panetta, conwalive caller: they call it a right-to- work states, but i guess the language got changed, because it used to be a free will state. the employers without unions had the right to fire you for anything, any reason or no reason at all, and you had no recourse. so i still believe in unions and i still believe the people should have a right to join or not. host: this tweet -- are you with us? caller: i am. host: higher wages of less jobs in the state's. caller: yes, but most of the jobs in this area, in the myrtle beach area, those are minimum- wage jobs, where i live. if we
even have to consider borrowing money from china or anywhere else and we're worried about a a.a.a. credit rating. why should we even have that as an option? we're the richest country in the world, and we put food out everywhere. also, one brief note on the gun laws issue. they're not going to ban a particular type of car because it drove through a crowd. so i don't see how they can target any particular weapon and say it's worse than another. combat loading weapon, you can almost do that as fast as you can pull the trigger also. so it's not a matter of how many rounds you can shoot. it's a matter of an insane person getting a hold of anything -- a knife, a car, anything. so -- guest: keith, and the reality of using guns for whatever illegal purposes oftentimes gets lost into washington, d.c. and the politics. boy, we're going to have to do something. we are going to have a press release, a press conference. there is a second amendment. thankfully the supreme court has recognized it is an individual right and a narrow decision. the one thing i want to go back, small business th
deadly before the vote with critics fearing an era of islamic rule and fewer personal freedoms. >> china launched this, the longest bullet train line in the world, the first one that left beijing this morning zipping down to guangzhou, about the distance from new york to key west. the trip will take eight hours. >> it would be nice to have that here. >>> american soldiers targeted in a bomb attack overseas. we'll go live to the pentagon after this. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. i get congested. but now, with zyrtec-d®, i have the proven allergy relief of zyrtec®, plus a powerful decongestant. zyrtec-d® lets
of the year. we have stability in china because of economic activity and that was a drag and then we have the doj promising tease and the federal reserve doing the same thing and all of a sudden it is not the world looking over the cliff, but we 3-quarters of the world looking the other way starting to come back and that is the difference. tracy: what happens? we are stealing from queue to. >> we always steal from one quarter to another. tracy: europe might come back to bother us again the second half of the year. could that mean an okay first half, second half disaster's again? >> we never have smooth sailing at anything. sell in may and go away. which works sometimes and doesn't work. what we feel good about is investors are forced with a problem that dividend taxes are going to go up. to me that is a good problem because it is going to take investors out of the safety of the blue chips and staples and utilities and put them into faster growth equities. riskier. if we look at the risk bucket of assets if you look at low-quality munis and wrapped around a head for awhile, 3.5% yield pret
, china and india in particular are actually the source of most of the increasing greenhouse fasts that we've seen in recent years and the united states is at a level of greenhouse gas emissions it hasn't been at in over a decade. so, partially due to our own repressed economy, but partialingly due to the fact that you're talking about regulations and alternative fuels, the u.s. economy and other industriallized economies have actually seen their emissions stabilize or even fall over the past decade. >> yeah, and china, they're a big polluter. i mean, if you go into a store and you break something, you pay for it. so, if we can prove that a country is a big polluter, why shouldn't they pay? >> the problem is that even if the united states, all the other stilllized countries complied with what the secretary-general was talking about, it actually wouldn't do anything in terms of greenhouse gas emissions because the growth in the greenhouse gas emissions is coming with the developing world and it would be almost symbolic gesture in terms of global warming which is their theory and do nothing
taxpayers' dollars, the steel came from china. what are we doing to america and what are we doing to our manufacturing? i think we need a wake-up call. we're busy holding up the entire congress, protecting tax breaks for billionaires. when are we going to start looking out for american jobs? when we're talking about this fiscal cliff, we're not talking about having a jobs component in it. when are we going to start talking about tax breaks so we can have an infrastructure bank, so we can rebuild america using american products. and why is it when they say you want it made in america, they call us protectionist. well, i welcome the call of protection. i want to protect american jobs. i don't want them on a slow boat to china or a fast track to mexico. i might not ever get my steel mill back. baltimore might not ever have those jobs back but, you know, we've got to get serious in our country, what are our priorities. we have to start rewarding those industries that make products in this country. right now our whole code is oriented to protecting people who make money off of money. well, le
from iran, north korea, china, et cetera. and a defense department has more than 3 million people scattered across this world. it's someone that really understands defense. someone that's spent their entire life working the bureaucracy that knows the industrial base that knows soldiers. you know, i have nothing against senator hagel. he is a fine man. i have met him before. i think he is well-intended. but what we need are people like michelle floornoid. ash hammer. we need people who know the systems inside-out. the president needs the best advice in a time of war and time of crisis. we are forcing says questions station. tenuous time for armed forces given all these threats. >> dave: after what john boehner said on friday it looks like sequestration could actually happen. the question is why does the president want chuck hagel. when you look at his background. maybe not a defense expert. the "the washington post" came out and said there are those who come -- democrats that would be to the right of chuck hagel in terms of his policies regarding wars and defense. so why is he the
on january 4th. they fear this could be to natural gas production what the "china syndrome" was to the nuclear power industry. it stars matt damon looking to line up leases in pennsylvania farm country and john as a environmental activist to try to stop him. >> i'm here my farm is gone. the land turned brown. it happened to one of us. it could happen to all of us. >> reporter: damon and chris since ski who co-wrote the script together, they're using fracking as jumping off point to explore american identity. >> it really asks more questions than it answers but they're important questions that i think we're all need to be asking right now. >> reporter: but conservative blogs like the heritage foundation say this move -- movie looks nothing on surface to be hit piece on tracking indisstri. analysts say this could be a big problem going forward. charles edwards with the brookings institution. >> someone like matt damon will make convincing actor, undoubtedly casting concerns about shale gas on the horizon. that will probably become a lot of people's perceptions that shale gas
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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